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Legal Benefits Of A Truck Accident Specialist

Many folks never guess the time will come when they're going to want a truck injury attorney, but roadway mishaps involving trailer trucks, semis, eighteen wheelers and other big trucks are in fact a lot more common than most individuals could ever imagine. And sadly, injuries including these oversize vehicles are prone to result in physical injury, even death, than the conventional car crash.

Many variables enter into this propensity. First of all, the absolute weight of these vehicles makes the effect of a crash much worse than it'd be with an automobile that is typical. Then variable in the fact you have got yourself a perfect recipe for catastrophe, and that it requires a big rig a considerably longer leeway time to come to a full stop. People that have suffered as an outcome of a truck driving mishap, nevertheless, need not be in vain and misery have their pain. A truck injury attorney can really help them get.

According to Isaacs Truck Attorneys and based on 2010 data compiled through the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) as well as the Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS), nationally a total of 112,379 big trucks and 12,763 buses were involved in nonfatal crashes over the one-year interval. Of these crashes, 44,310 big trucks and 6,854 buses included harms. That equates to 39.4% and 53.7% respectively, meaning that if you are involved in an accident with either a large truck or a bus, you've about a one in two chance of being physically hurt.

The total amounts might be smaller, in case you chance to be a resident of Ohio, but unfortunately the percents are even worse. In 2010, 4,894 big trucks and 681 buses were involved in nonfatal crashes in the state. Of these mishaps, buses resulted in including 2,021 including big trucks and 406 harms. Percent wise, those amounts sum to 41.3% and 59.6% respectively or nearly three in five chances of bus crash harm.

Opportunities that are not great, are they? What is more, not one of these figures consider the amount of people that are killed as an outcome of a truck accident. Imagine if you by chance find yourself in such an all too-common, ill-fated circumstances? You need to touch base using a truck injury attorney when possible to talk about the damages you're legally owed.

A truck injury attorney specializes in trailer truck, semi, eighteen wheeler, big truck and bus accidents. Because of this, this kind of lawyer is able to help optimize the monetary redress you'll receive in a court of law. This really is an important factor given the medical bills-not to mention lost time from work-that often pile up following a truck accident.

It is clear that following a serious crash would be the final thing in your head. At the exact same time, you do not need to settle for less than you're worse, or deserved, nothing at all. A truck injury attorney will fight for your benefit, setting her or his legal expertise to work to let you get the justice you have earned. Do not waste another minute, anguish in vain. Get in touch with a truck accident attorney today.

Do Not Spend More Money Than You Should

The whole issue of managing your money wisely is all about keeping track of how much you spend and knowing how to cut unnecessary expense. Thus, it is vital that you acquire financial knowledge no matter how less important it may sound. Such knowledge will enable you understand how to work on your expenditure today and also save for the future.

Who works without a budget?
It is a hard economy and therefore you need to be accountable to yourself for every penny that you spend. It is easy, just do some budgeting and you will not regret it. By coming up with a budget, you will have the amount you earn in mind, as well as the total expenditure in a given time span. Include all monies that you make, even if it is from a side business that you have established to make you extra income. After taxes, what remains is what you should spend. That is your money. Plan to spend that.

After budget - it's the expenses
You then need to come up with a list of all your expenses, account for every penny however minimal it may seem to you. Make sure you include obvious payments such as rent and monthly loan dues and also the other occasional expenses you incur such as the trips you make to the theatre. The list of expenses shows you what you spend your money on, so that you can know what to eliminate from your list when coming up with your budget. For example, you can download movies online and watch them on your laptop instead of going to the theatre for the newest releases, or you can hire a DVD from the store.

Lowering your utility bills
The other section of your expenses you can cut is the utility bills that come due to energy consumption. You realize that cooling and heating buildings uses a lot of energy. What to do? To reduce the bills invest in technologies that save on energy such as weatherization. Replace your energy consuming water heater with a tankless heater, one that saves on energy. Why store hot water that will get cold with time and has to be heated all over again?

Insulate the walls and repair the roof
If the units of electricity your heater or air conditioner uses is way above, then you need to check your roofing and insulation. Make improvements in these two areas to cut utility bills. Always have them inspected frequently for any inadequacies. The changes come with some expenses yes, but you will be glad you undertook them.

You can do many things to cut expenses. However, the most important thing for you is to know how to manage your money. No matter how much or how little money you make, if you do not manage it, it will never be enough.

Can You Turn Your Investment Loss Into Tax Savings?

This is a great question and a perfect time to be asking it. It's always smart to review and rebalance your portfolio at year-end to make sure your asset allocation is still on target. It's also a good time to consider harvesting some capital losses. By doing so, you may ultimately be able to trim your losses and your taxes -- as long as you complete any sales by the end of the year.

So before your holiday to-do list gets too overwhelming, take the time to review your investments -- both winners and losers -- to see if balancing capital gains and losses could lower your tax bill. It's not a difficult process, but it does take some careful calculations. Here's a step-by-step guide and an example to help you get started.

Categorize your investments as either short term or long term

For tax purposes, investments are considered either short-term or long-term. A short-term investment is one that you've held for one year or less. A long-term investment is one that you've held for more than a year.

This time difference is important because realized gains on short-term holdings are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. Gains on long-term holdings are taxed at a much lower rate -- from 0 percent to 20 percent depending on your tax bracket.

Calculate your long- and short-term gains and losses

Of course, you only realize a capital gain (or loss) when you sell an investment in a taxable account. But once you decide what to sell, you'll want to carefully calculate your estimated gains and losses. That's because you can use up to $3,000 of losses to offset any gains in a particular year to potentially bring your tax bill down. Any losses above the $3,000 may be carried forward indefinitely to offset gains in future years.

Because both capital gains and capital losses are categorized as either short-term or long-term depending on how long you've held the investment, almost every sale will create one of the following four results: a long-term capital gain (LTCG), a long-term capital loss (LTCL), a short-term capital gain (STCG), or a short-term capital loss (STCL).

How these net out will determine if you ultimately have a capital gain or loss, and what kind.

Net out your gains and losses to come up with a single number This is a three-step process:

Net your LTCGs against your LTCLs. Net your STCGs against your STCLs. Net your long-term result against your short-term result to come up with a single taxable figure.

Here's an example of how this works: This year Sam decided to sell several investments in his taxable account. His sale of long-term investments resulted in a LTCG of $11,000 and a LTCL of $6,000, which netted out to a LTCG of $5,000. He also made short-term sales that resulted in a STCG of $5,000 and a STCL of $6,000, which netted out to a STCL of $1,000.

Sam was then able to net out his capital gains and losses--$5000 in long-term gains against $1,000 in short-term losses--to come up with a $4,000 long-term capital gain. This provides a valuable benefit for Sam because he was able to make the sales he wanted, lower his capital gains, and end up paying only the lower long-term capital gains tax rate.

If Sam had ended up with a net capital loss, he'd be able to deduct up to $3,000 against his ordinary income and carry over any remainder as a deduction in future years. Either way, he's ahead in terms of taxes.

Watch out for the wash-sale rule

Sometimes it can make sense to sell a stock or mutual fund to take a tax loss even if you think it's ultimately a keeper and figure you'll buy it back at a future date. Seems like a smart move, but watch out for the wash-sale rule. If you sell a security at a loss and buy the same or a "substantially identical" security within thirty days, the loss is generally disallowed for tax purposes. The IRS doesn't miss a trick!

Be sure to specify shares on a partial sale

Here's another potential catch. When you sell, your broker is required to report the cost basis for stocks purchased after January 1, 2011. When you make a partial sale, the default method is FIFO, or "first in, first out." FIFO may not be the most tax-efficient method, however, especially if you bought additional shares later at a higher cost. But you do have the option to specify which shares you want to sell, so if you've purchased shares of the same investment at different prices, you may be able to lower capital gains and minimize taxes by selling shares with a higher cost basis.

This year-end maneuver can potentially make a difference in your tax bill, but don't let it cloud your long-term perspective. Always keep your goals and your asset allocation top of mind as you consider what and when to buy and sell. To me, that's the real key to smart investing.

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Looking for answers to your retirement questions? Check out Carrie's new book, "The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions."

This article originally appeared on You can e-mail Carrie at, or click here for additional Ask Carrie columns. This column is no substitute for an individualized recommendation, tax, legal or personalized investment advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner or investment manager. Diversification cannot ensure a profit or eliminate the risk of investment losses.

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